The Story Hidden Behind the Monuments of Austrian Imperial Palace

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Originally published at https://ctdots.eu on April 27, 2020.

The Summer Residency of Habsburgs

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Schönbrunn Palace and the panorama of its gardens from the Gloriette. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots

Katterburg (1548)

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I never visited Schönbrunn without meeting a squirrel. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots

Royal Hunting Grounds (1569)

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Emu could be seen by all visitors of Schönbrunn. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots
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Though Schönbrunn park is mostly known for its palace and gardens, half of it is covered by a forest. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots

The Legend of Schöner Brunnen

Schönbrunn Palace (1742–63)

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The beautiful garden gates are just one out of many “small” details, making the whole park as glorious and majestic as it is. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots
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Schönbrunn Palace is surrounded by the magnicifent symmetrical gardens. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots
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Schönbrunn gardens are full of statues of Hellenic Heroes. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots
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The final version of Schönbrunn Palace was built under the rule of Maria Theresa. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots

The Columbary (1750)

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Traditionally the Columbary is also known as ‘Schönbrunn Merry-go-round’. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots

Schönbrunn Zoo (1752)

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Emperors used to eat their breakfast in the Central Pavilion surrounded by the exotic animals. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots
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She doesn’t look too stressed, isn’t she? Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots

Botanic Garden (1753)

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Palm House and Botanic Garden are built on land bought of Hietzing. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots
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Sunsets from the Botanic Garden are simply stunning. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots

The Gloriette (1775)

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The Gloriette looks like a triumphal arc on steroids. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots
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A half of the Gloriette was bombed during WWII and had to be rebuilt. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots
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The Great Parterre is an open area between The Gloriette, the Great Parterre & Schönbrunn Palace and the Neptune Fountain. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots

The Obelisk Fountain (1777)

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The Obelisk Fountain of Schönbrunn Palace Gardens. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots
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The intersections of stelliform systems of avenues on each side of Schönbrunn are decorated with the Naiad Fountains. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots

The Roman Ruins (1778)

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Originally, the Roman Ruins was known as Ruins of Carthage. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots
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At the center of the Roman Ruins are the river-gods of Danube and Enns. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots
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The Great Parterre will surprise with its size. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots

The Great Parterre and Neptune Fountain (1776–1780)

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At the center of statue — the sea-goddess Thetis pleading to sea-god Neptune. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots
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It took decade to complete the full complex of the Great Parterre. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots

Schönbrunn Public Gardens (1779)

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The complexity of the gardens displayed the status of the authority. Schönbrunn Gardens are very very complex.. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots

My Impressions of Schönbrunn Palace and its Gardens

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Standing in the Great Parterre — the largest space in the gardens. Photo by A.L. [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots
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Ehrenhof fountain of Schönbrunn Palace. Photo by Alis Monte [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Connecting the Dots
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Travel Blogger, Web Designer & AMP Developer | Travel & History Journal: https://www.ctdots.eu | AMP Development & Web Design Tutorials: https://ampire.city

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